Which attitude for hire?

In management world, you will often hear the following quote:

hire for attitude train for skills

The quote is good and hit the point. However even after you agree that attitude is better than skills for hiring people, knowing which “attitude” that are being mentioned in the quote is important. I will say that, without knowing the attitude that is mentioned in the quote, you better hire for skills instead.

In this article, I’ll use many references from Pawel Brodzinski. His writing is insightful and he is good at management. Moreover, he also had written one article titled “Why I Genuinely Want To Work With You“, a very similar with this one.

The essential attitude : Honest, open handed and cheerful

Essential attitude are useful in any kind of job.

For me, the very essential attitude, required and isn’t negotiable is honesty. A person I want to work with, or hire must be a honest person. Brodzinski also say that in business, the trust isn’t measurable. For me, honesty is the most important part in building trust. Dishonest person won’t make a great partner, and they will even make me work under suspicion and making me take extra step to prevent them stabbing me in the back.

The second essential attitude is open handed and willing to help, If they are willing to help me, I will do the same and am willing to help them. No matter how skilled someone is, if they are not willing to help, their ability won’t be much of use.

Last is cheerful. Why cheerful? A cheerful person will bring positive energy to workplace. They will brighten other employees and they can get more motivation and less stressed. In front-desk jobs, a cheerful person will be more liked by customers rather than a gloomy one. You wouldn’t want to work with a gloomy person, right? Worse if that gloomy person is your supervisor.

Note: There may be several disagreement about those three attitudes can be useful in any job. Ex: cheerful factory worker or honest sales. It is conditional though and can be interpreted differently. Ex: the sales is honest to the company and only do small lies to the customer, or cheerful factory worker can be serious at working and fun at break time.

The job-supporting attitude

Different job need different supporting attitude. That’s why you cannot determine that an attitude will be useful for any line of job, even if the attitude is positive one. For example: a manager or CEO will need to have innovative and creative thinking attitude, while a factory worker need not to have that attitude. A non-innovative or non-creative factory worker is better than innovative one, because they can follow order and won’t complain about the current system. It’s cruel I know, but it’s what the business needs.

The same is applied with the so-called good attitude: “hard worker” and “can work under pressure”. Both of them has very specific appliances and not all line of jobs benefit from them. Managers that is “hard worker” usually cannot manage well. They often do the work themselves and leading to micromanagement. If not, they usually prefer hard-worker staff, resulting in overtime, reduced employee happiness and reduced employee creativity and problem solving skill.

In programming world, they don’t need the “can work under pressure” attitude while most company stated that they need programmer with that kind of attitude. I don’t really understand the reasoning behind it. Unless the software they are developing is used in military, nuclear plants, airplanes or anything that can involve life beings, there won’t be any meaningful pressure.

Michelangelo, talent is cheap, dedication is costly!
– Bertoldo de Giovanni

For every job that need skill refinery such as smiting, music, crafting to even programming, dedication is a must-have trait. They need to be dedicated to their job, doing and doing the same thing countless time, refining they skills anytime to make them able to provide masterpieces.

Conclusion

There are essential attitudes, where the attitudes are useful in any line of job and the other attitudes are job-specifics. Knowing which attitudes to look for is as important as knowing that hiring for attitude is better than hiring for skills. When you are mistakenly looking for the wrong attitude required, you are hiring the bad employee.

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